dating for parets A relative age dating activity answer key

*Earth and Space Science: Fossils provide important evidence of how life and environmental conditions have changed.The complete "Paleontology and Dinosaurs" module takes approximately four weeks to teach. " activity is a 30-minute introduction to geologic time.

Sequencing the rock layers will show students how paleontologists use fossils to give relative dates to rock strata.

Once students begin to grasp "relative" dating, they can extend their knowledge of geologic time by exploring radiometric dating and developing a timeline of Earth's history.

Materials: two sets of sequence cards in random order (set A: nonsense syllables; set B: sketches of fossils), pencil, paper Procedure Set A: 1) Spread the cards with the nonsense syllables on the table and determine the correct sequence of the eight cards by comparing letters that are common to individual cards and, therefore, overlap.

The first card in the sequence has "Card 1, Set A" in the lower left-hand corner and represents the bottom of the sequence.

Time factors of millions and billions of years is difficult even for adults to comprehend.

However, "relative" dating or time can be an easy concept for students to learn.INTRODUCTION Scientists have good evidence that the earth is very old, approximately four and one-half billion years old.Scientific measurements such as radiometric dating use the natural radioactivity of certain elements found in rocks to help determine their age.In this activity, students begin a sequencing activity with familiar items — letters written on cards.Once they are able to manipulate the cards into the correct sequence, they are asked to do a similar sequencing activity using fossil pictures printed on "rock layer" cards.Locally, physical characteristics of rocks can be compared and correlated.