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This is consistent with the assumption that each decay event is independent and its chance does not vary over time.where is the half-life of the element, is the time expired since the sample contained the initial number atoms of the nuclide, and is the remaining amount of the nuclide.

They tie themselves in logical knots trying to reconcile the results of radiometric dating with the unwavering belief that the Earth was created ex nihilo about 6,000 to 10,000 years ago.Indeed, special creationists have for many years held that where science and their religion conflict, it is a matter of science having to catch up with scripture, not the other way around.Radiometric dating — through processes similar to those outlined in the example problem above — frequently reveals that rocks, fossils, etc.are very much older than the approximately 6,000 to 10,000 years reckoned by young earth creationists.Carbon-14 decays almost completely within 100,000 years of the organism dying, and many fossils and rock strata are hundreds of times older than that.

To date older fossils, other methods are used, such as potassium-argon or argon-argon dating.Similar kinds of problems are seen in the case of potassium-argon dating, which is considered one of the most reliable methods. Andrew Snelling, a geologist, points out several of these problems with potassium-argon, as seen in Table 7.know the true age, then how can it be trusted to give us the correct age for rocks that had no human observers to record when they formed?The key is to measure an isotope that has had time to decay a measurable amount, but not so much as to only leave a trace remaining.Given isotopes are useful for dating over a range from a fraction of their half life to about four or five times their half life.Symbolically, the process of radioactive decay can be expressed by the following differential equation, where N is the quantity of decaying nuclei and k is a positive number called the exponential decay constant.