aaf the dating guy s01e11 woodplicity Radio dating methods

Scientists insist that Earth is 4.6 billion years old C14 dating was being discussed at a symposium on the prehistory of the Nile Valley.A famous American colleague, Professor Brew, briefly summarized a common attitude among archaeologists towards it, as follows:"If a C14 date supports our theories, we put it in the main text.If it does not entirely contradict them, we put it in a footnote.

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This does not mean that all rock samples are unreliable, but it is possible to account for a process which throws off the data for metamorphic rocks.For example, with Uranium-lead dating with the crystallization of magma, this remains a closed system until the uranium decays.Carbon dating, with its much lower maximum theoretical range, is often used for dating items only hundreds and thousands of years old, so can be calibrated in its lower ranges by comparing results with artifacts who's ages are known from historical records.Scientists have also attempted to extend the calibration range by comparing results to timber which has its age calculated by dendrochronology, but this has also been questioned because carbon dating is used to assist with working out dendrochronological ages.Young earth creationists therefore claim that radiometric dating methods are not reliable and can therefore not be used to disprove Biblical chronology.

Although radiometric dating methods are widely quoted by scientists, they are inappropriate for aging the entire universe due to likely variations in decay rates.There are a number of implausible assumptions involved in radiometric dating with respect to long time periods.One key assumption is that the initial quantity of the parent element can be determined.However, the temperature required to do this is in in the millions of degrees, so this cannot be achieved by any natural process that we know about.The second way that a nucleus could be disrupted is by particles striking it.Otherwise, calibration consists of comparing results with ages determined by other radiometric dating methods.