Radiometric dating volcanic ash www sapphosdating com

This same failure is also known to occur in many other rocks, including both recent volcanics18and ancient crustal rocks.19 The radioactive potassium-argon dating method has been demonstrated to fail on 1949, 1954, and 1975 lava flows at Mt Ngauruhoe, New Zealand, in spite of the quality of the laboratory’s K–Ar analytical work.Argon gas, brought up from deep inside the earth within the molten rock, was already present in the lavas when they cooled.

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How much better to place our confidence in the Creator who made and knows everything, and who never fails or tells lies, than in a radioactive dating method that has been repeatedly demonstrated to fail and to yield false ages for the earth’s rocks.

Fossils are almost never dated by radiometric methods, since they rarely contain suitable radioactive elements.

How can we trust the use of this same “dating” on rocks whose ages we don’t know?

If the method fails on rocks when we have an independent eye-witness account, then why should we trust it on other rocks where there are no independent historical cross-checks?

On the other hand, the sedimentary rock (as I know) usually provide the time of formation by age range of fossil e.g. Is there any method to make it more specific like the crystalline one?

Standing roughly in the centre of New Zealand’s North Island, Mt Ngauruhoe is New Zealand’s newest volcano and one of the most active (Figures 1 and 2).These include radiometric dating of volcanic layers above or below the fossils or by comparisons to similar rocks and fossils of known ages.Knowing when a dinosaur or other animal lived is important because it helps us place them on the evolutionary family tree.A common way of dating fossils (and rocks which do not contain radioactive elements) is by “dating” an associated volcanic rock. It depends on the rate at which radioactive potassium decays into the gas argon.The K–Ar method works on the assumption that the “clock” begins to “tick” the moment that the rock hardens.Of course, no geologist was present to test this assumption by observing ancient lavas when they cooled, but we can study modern lava flows. The samples were sent progressively in batches to Geochron Laboratories in Cambridge, Boston (USA), for whole-rock potassium-argon (K–Ar) dating—first a piece of one sample from each flow, then a piece of the second sample from each flow after the first set of results was received, and finally, a piece of the third sample from the 30 June 1954 flow.15 To also test the consistency of results within samples, second pieces of two of the 30 June 1954 lava samples were also sent for analysis. No specific location or expected age information was supplied to the laboratory.