Validating with

So, let’s open the Idea and add the following annotations to the title property: annotation on the other hand we can tell the min/max size of the field, in this case the title should be at least 1 character and at most 30 characters, while the description has no minimal length but should not be longer than 100 characters. Idea), with 1 error(s): [Field error in object 'idea' on field 'title': rejected value [null]; codes [Not title, Not Null.title, Not lang.Now all we have to do is to indicate where we want to validate our beans using the Validation failed for argument at index 0 in method: public be.g00glen00b.model. String, Not Null]; arguments [org.springframework.context.support. Default Message Source Resolvable: codes [idea.title,title]; arguments []; default message [title; default message [error.title.notnull]] I don’t like it to have this kind of error messages, so how about we customize them?

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So, let’s open the Idea and add the following annotations to the title property: annotation on the other hand we can tell the min/max size of the field, in this case the title should be at least 1 character and at most 30 characters, while the description has no minimal length but should not be longer than 100 characters. Idea), with 1 error(s): [Field error in object 'idea' on field 'title': rejected value [null]; codes [Not title, Not Null.title, Not lang.

Now all we have to do is to indicate where we want to validate our beans using the Validation failed for argument at index 0 in method: public be.g00glen00b.model. String, Not Null]; arguments [org.springframework.context.support. Default Message Source Resolvable: codes [idea.title,title]; arguments []; default message [title]]; default message [error.title.notnull]] I don’t like it to have this kind of error messages, so how about we customize them?

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Back to the drawing tables First of all, let’s get back to the Idea entity and check the annotations.Each validation annotation allows you to add a message property, so let’s add something like this: @Column @Not Null(message = "error.title.notnull") @Size(min = 1, max = 30, message = "error.title.size") private String title; @Column @Size(max = 100, message = "error.description.size") private String description; This tells Spring to look at the messages folder for files starting with messages.After importing the project to your IDE you can start programming.In this example I will be working with “an idea”, a model consisting out of 4 properties, the ID, a title, a description and the date it was created at.Therefore, you also have to make sure that the values that users enter can be correctly converted to the appropriate data types.

You might also have certain restrictions on the values.For example, if you’re using the NL (Dutch) locale, Spring will first look for messages/messages_nl.properties and if it couldn’t find anything it would be looking at messages/messages.properties.I’m not going to implement multiple languages right now, so I’m just going to add a file called messages.properties inside src/main/resources/messages: The last step is to make it work so that our custom messages are used in stead of the standard error message.Don’t worry if you didn’t follow my previous tutorial, I will start from scratch again!Since I’m going to start with a fresh Spring project, I’m going to choose for a Spring Boot project.To set up the project itself you can make the project manually, or you can use the online Initializr wizard.