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Addressing social norms about the acceptability of violence in schools and ensuring that educational systems promote strong educational growth for all students are additional strategies.

Runaway and homeless youth agencies and domestic violence victims’ services providers share a mutual goal: enhancing the safety and healing of young people living situations marked by violence and abuse.

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The characteristics of the community surrounding schools also influence the likelihood of school violence.By making changes in communities, school violence can decrease.Finally, by enhancing parent involvement in both academic and social aspects of their children’s school experiences – including involving parents in prevention programs – family cohesion and communication are improved.Prevention approaches that involve the family, especially those that start early, can have substantial, long-term effects in reducing violent behavior.Youth’s experiences, knowledge, and skills can influence their likelihood of becoming involved in violence.

Strengthening young people’s abilities to effectively solve difficulties that arise and their opportunities to participate in prosocial activities can significantly reduce the risk for violence.Positive relationships between students and their prosocial peers, teachers, and families can be critical assets in promoting youth’s well-being and preventing school violence.Several strategies to enhance these relationships have been found to be effective in reducing violence.Some effective community level strategies include providing youth with more structured and supervised afterschool opportunities, such as mentoring programs or recreational activities, in order to increase monitoring and healthy skill development of youth.The broader social and cultural climate that surrounds schools affects the likelihood of school violence.This known effectiveness stands in contrast to commonly used prevention strategies, such as metal detectors and other security measures, for which there is insufficient data to determine their benefits and some evidence to suggest that they may negatively impact students’ perceptions of safety.